Mining For Meaning: "Mine" The Word To Make It More Meaningful

 

What we like to read changes every few years. In the 8th century people liked Beowulf. In 1600 people liked Shakespear (written in poetry or plays). In 1954 people liked Lord of the Rings (very heavy in description). And now we’ve changed again to where description is getting smaller and smaller because readers want action action action.

 

So it’s not enough anymore to say, "The stab wound hurt" "he was angry" "she was in love". You need to "mine" the words hurt, angry, love – dig deep into what those words ARE:

 

Instead of: The stab wound hurt

Try instead: White hot fire sizzled deep inside the wound (this is what the word "hurt" might look like once you mine down to the bare bones of the meaning of the word.) 

 

Instead of: She was angry

Try instead: A fanged monster clinched teeth around her calm and shook until she was poisoned with the need for vengeance. (This is what the word "angry" might look like once you mine down to the bare bones of the meaning of the word. Naturally, yours will be different than mine.)

 

Instead of: She was in love

Try instead: A whisper teased for her to dwell on deliciously forbidden things that got her heart to race so she had to walk around to expel the burning energy. (This is what the word "love" might look like once you mine down to the bare bones of the meaning of the word.)

 

Flesh out the story. Mine those words and figure what they mean and use that meaning instead of the definition.

 

 

 

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